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First FRCR Anatomy: Mock Papers

First FRCR Anatomy: Mock Papers

Although fundamental human anatomy has not signifcantly altered over the past century, the
radiologist’s ability to view and perceive the human body has been revolutionised over the last few
decades. The specialty of radiology has advanced rapidly and its exponential growth has resulted
in it being one of the leaders in modern day medicine. New engineering and technological feats
have created an array of imaging modalities that are now seen in radiology departments around
the world.
The ability to recognise the abnormal is based on the concept of being comfortable in knowing
what is normal. Normal anatomy is taught on numerous occasions during different stages in our
career, at medical school attending dissections or intra-operatively in surgical theatres. It is the
radiologist’s duty and challenge to translate this embedded knowledge and interpret both the
normal and abnormal on a two-dimensional image. Through radiology training, trainees acquire
the ability to read in two dimensions but see in three.
In parallel with having the fortune of cross-sectional imaging at our fngertips, comes the
continual endeavour for the radiologist to further acquire the understanding of what normal
looks like in great detail. Computed tomography has given us exceptional spatial resolution while
magnetic resonance shows extraordinary soft tissue contrast. At times, both modalities may be
utilised on any individual patient, however their portrayal of anatomy will defer. It also becomes
evident that even the same modality may show great differences of how the anatomy is presented
on screen, be it different contrast phases in CT or different weighted sequences in MR.
The Royal College of Radiologists re-implemented the First FRCR anatomy module in 2010.
The exam focuses on normal ‘radiological anatomy’ utilising all current imaging modalities. The
authors have reflected on their experience of the exam and have written this book to aid exam
preparation. Tips and aides-mémoires have been included, which helped us get past this difcult
yet very satisfactory hurdle in our career. The cases in this book cannot completely cover the
entirety of human anatomy, however they do encompass the fundamentals of each anatomical
system. Some questions will be easy whereas others will be extremely difcult.
Use this text as a start to your radiological career and continue to study normal radiological
anatomy: it is fundamental to the understanding of pathology and to the expertise you bring to
patients’ diagnosis and treatment.

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First FRCR Anatomy: Mock Papers First FRCR Anatomy: Mock Papers Reviewed by Radiology Madeeasy on 10:29 PM Rating: 5
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